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Life under the Sun

The Garden, the Thorns, and the Vine

Ecclesiastes 6:10-7:14

10 Whatever has come to be has already been named, and it is known what man is, and that he is not able to dispute with one stronger than he. 11 The more words, the more vanity, and what is the advantage to man? 12 For who knows what is good for man while he lives the few days of his vain life, which he passes like a shadow? For who can tell man what will be after him under the sun?

7:1 A good name is better than precious ointment,
and the day of death than the day of birth.
It is better to go to the house of mourning
than to go to the house of feasting,
for this is the end of all mankind,
and the living will lay it to heart.
Sorrow is better than laughter,
for by sadness of face the heart is made glad.
The heart of the wise is in the house of mourning,
but the heart of fools is in the house of mirth.
It is better for a man to hear the rebuke of the wise
than to hear the song of fools.
For as the crackling of thorns under a pot,
so is the laughter of the fools;
this also is vanity.
Surely oppression drives the wise into madness,
and a bribe corrupts the heart.
Better is the end of a thing than its beginning,
and the patient in spirit is better than the proud in spirit.
Be not quick in your spirit to become angry,
for anger lodges in the bosom of fools.
10 Say not, “Why were the former days better than these?”
For it is not from wisdom that you ask this.
11 Wisdom is good with an inheritance,
an advantage to those who see the sun.
12 For the protection of wisdom is like the protection of money,
and the advantage of knowledge is that wisdom preserves the life of him who has it.
13 Consider the work of God:
who can make straight what he has made crooked?

14 In the day of prosperity be joyful, and in the day of adversity consider: God has made the one as well as the other, so that man may not find out anything that will be after him. (ESV)

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Responding to the Resurrection

This week we look into the question, if Jesus raised Lazarus and shows that he has power over sin and death, how do we respond to him?

Note:We have been experiencing some recording errors which have delayed our posting of these sermons.

 

John 11:45-12:11

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Jesus and Lazarus

Today we come to a story that could easily be seen as the climax of the first of half of the Gospel of John. In the passage this week Jesus raises a man from the dead, and in doing so gives us a glimpse into the power and the passion that Jesus has towards his people.

Note:We have been experiencing some recording errors which have delayed our posting of these sermons.

 

John 11:1-44

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An Offensive Faith

Today we come to a text where Jesus interacts with a stubborn group of people and pushes more and more to convey the message that he has come from heaven to bring life through his sacrificial death.

The Gospel (which means “Good New” in Greek) is the story of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ. While there are four Gospel accounts of Jesus’ life, John is written from a unique style which is both poetic and profound. Over the next several months Grace & Peace will walking through the Gospel of John.

Note:We could not record Jan. 29th’s sermon, so the we are unfortunately missing the John 6:1-21 passage Preached by the Rev. Tim Geiger.

John 6:22-59

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Welcoming Jesus vs. Honor Jesus

This week, we look at a curious passage where Jesus, at first, seems to be rejecting a father’s request to heal his son. What we come to understand is that Jesus desires more than just to heal this boy, he desires to give this man life, as well.

The Gospel (which means “Good New” in Greek) is the story of the life and ministry of Jesus Christ. While there are four Gospel accounts of Jesus’ life, John is written from a unique style which is both poetic and profound. Over the next several months Grace & Peace will walking through the Gospel of John.

Note: We had troubles recording the sermons the two weeks prior to Christmas, and had a joint service which was unrecorded on the 25th.

A Grief Observed

Written after his wife’s tragic death as a way of surviving the “mad midnight moment,” A Grief Observed is C.S. Lewis’s honest reflection on the fundamental issues of life, death, and faith in the midst of loss. This work contains his concise, genuine reflections on that period: “Nothing will shake a man — or at any rate a man like me — out of his merely verbal thinking and his merely notional beliefs. He has to be knocked silly before he comes to his senses. Only torture will bring out the truth. Only under torture does he discover it himself.” This is a beautiful and unflinchingly homest record of how even a stalwart believer can lose all sense of meaning in the universe, and how he can gradually regain his bearings.